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Difference between revisions of "Verrall Wass"

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Verrall Wass (July 13, 1909 - ) born in England, was a prolific author and inventor. He originated hundreds of ideas that were published in books and  magazines. He writings appeared in Chinese, Indian, Australian and American publications. His British publishers included [[Edward Bagshawe]], [[Will Goldston]] and [[George Armstrong]].
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| birth_day                = July 13,
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'''Verrall Wass''' (1909-2005) born in England, was a prolific author and inventor.  
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== Biography ==
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He originated hundreds of ideas that were published in books and  magazines. He writings appeared in Chinese, Indian, Australian and American publications. His British publishers included [[Edward Bagshawe]], [[Will Goldston]] and [[George Armstrong]].
  
 
Some of Verrall’s very early performances were given in Chinese costume as a silent act.
 
Some of Verrall’s very early performances were given in Chinese costume as a silent act.
  
 
His first book was dedicated to Ned Williams (who went on to become [[Robert Harbin]]) with whom a friendship began when Williams first arrived in England from South Africa. Among his other friends were [[Maurice Fogel]] and [[Rameses]].
 
His first book was dedicated to Ned Williams (who went on to become [[Robert Harbin]]) with whom a friendship began when Williams first arrived in England from South Africa. Among his other friends were [[Maurice Fogel]] and [[Rameses]].
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He also published [[Verrall's Mystery Monthly]] to promote his books.
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He died in Essex in 2005.
  
 
==Books==
 
==Books==
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* Astound Your Audience, Vol. 2 (1936)
 
* Astound Your Audience, Vol. 2 (1936)
 
* Visible Magic (1944)
 
* Visible Magic (1944)
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* 32 New Drawing Room Deceptions (1949)
 
* Magically Yours (1953)
 
* Magically Yours (1953)
  
== References ==
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{{References}}
 
* Verrall Wass, [[Wizard]], Vol. 7, No. 79 (Aug, 1954)
 
* Verrall Wass, [[Wizard]], Vol. 7, No. 79 (Aug, 1954)
[[Category:Biographies|Wass, Verrall]]
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[[Category:Biographies]]
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{{DEFAULTSORT:Wass,Verrall}}

Latest revision as of 15:03, 16 November 2021

Verrall Wass
BornJuly 13, 1909
Anerley, England
Died2005
Essex, England

Verrall Wass (1909-2005) born in England, was a prolific author and inventor.

Biography

He originated hundreds of ideas that were published in books and magazines. He writings appeared in Chinese, Indian, Australian and American publications. His British publishers included Edward Bagshawe, Will Goldston and George Armstrong.

Some of Verrall’s very early performances were given in Chinese costume as a silent act.

His first book was dedicated to Ned Williams (who went on to become Robert Harbin) with whom a friendship began when Williams first arrived in England from South Africa. Among his other friends were Maurice Fogel and Rameses.

He also published Verrall's Mystery Monthly to promote his books.

He died in Essex in 2005.

Books

  • Essence (1931)
  • Astound Your Audience, Vol. 1 (1936)
  • Astound Your Audience, Vol. 2 (1936)
  • Visible Magic (1944)
  • 32 New Drawing Room Deceptions (1949)
  • Magically Yours (1953)

References

  • Verrall Wass, Wizard, Vol. 7, No. 79 (Aug, 1954)